Ethical Hacking and Penetration Testing Resources

(Free) Virtual Networks (VPNs)

Custom Personal Targets

Archive/Repository

Books

Programming

Security Courses

Penetration Testing Methodologies, Tools and Technique

Penetration Testing Resources

Exploit Development

OSINT Resources

Social Engineering Resources

Lock Picking Resources

Operating Systems

Tools

Penetration Testing Distributions

  • Kali – GNU/Linux distribution designed for digital forensics and penetration testing.
  • ArchStrike – Arch GNU/Linux repository for security professionals and enthusiasts.
  • BlackArch – Arch GNU/Linux-based distribution for penetration testers and security researchers.
  • Network Security Toolkit (NST) – Fedora-based bootable live operating system designed to provide easy access to best-of-breed open source network security applications.
  • Pentoo – Security-focused live CD based on Gentoo.
  • BackBox – Ubuntu-based distribution for penetration tests and security assessments.
  • Parrot – Distribution similar to Kali, with multiple architecture.
  • Buscador – GNU/Linux virtual machine that is pre-configured for online investigators.
  • Fedora Security Lab – Provides a safe test environment to work on security auditing, forensics, system rescue and teaching security testing methodologies.
  • The Pentesters Framework – Distro organized around the Penetration Testing Execution Standard (PTES), providing a curated collection of utilities that eliminates often unused toolchains.
  • AttifyOS – GNU/Linux distribution focused on tools useful during Internet of Things (IoT) security assessments.

Docker for Penetration Testing

Multi-paradigm Frameworks

  • Metasploit – Software for offensive security teams to help verify vulnerabilities and manage security assessments.
  • Armitage – Java-based GUI front-end for the Metasploit Framework.
  • Faraday – Multiuser integrated pentesting environment for red teams performing cooperative penetration tests, security audits, and risk assessments.
  • ExploitPack – Graphical tool for automating penetration tests that ships with many pre-packaged exploits.
  • Pupy – Cross-platform (Windows, Linux, macOS, Android) remote administration and post-exploitation tool.

Vulnerability Scanners

  • Nexpose – Commercial vulnerability and risk management assessment engine that integrates with Metasploit, sold by Rapid7.
  • Nessus – Commercial vulnerability management, configuration, and compliance assessment platform, sold by Tenable.
  • OpenVAS – Free software implementation of the popular Nessus vulnerability assessment system.
  • Vuls – Agentless vulnerability scanner for GNU/Linux and FreeBSD, written in Go.

Static Analyzers

  • Brakeman – Static analysis security vulnerability scanner for Ruby on Rails applications.
  • cppcheck – Extensible C/C++ static analyzer focused on finding bugs.
  • FindBugs – Free software static analyzer to look for bugs in Java code.
  • sobelow – Security-focused static analysis for the Phoenix Framework.

Web Scanners

  • Nikto – Noisy but fast black box web server and web application vulnerability scanner.
  • Arachni – Scriptable framework for evaluating the security of web applications.
  • w3af – Web application attack and audit framework.
  • Wapiti – Black box web application vulnerability scanner with built-in fuzzer.
  • SecApps – In-browser web application security testing suite.
  • WebReaver – Commercial, graphical web application vulnerability scanner designed for macOS.
  • WPScan – Black box WordPress vulnerability scanner.
  • cms-explorer – Reveal the specific modules, plugins, components and themes that various websites powered by content management systems are running.
  • joomscan – Joomla vulnerability scanner.

Network Tools

  • zmap – Open source network scanner that enables researchers to easily perform Internet-wide network studies.
  • nmap – Free security scanner for network exploration & security audits.
  • pig – GNU/Linux packet crafting tool.
  • scanless – Utility for using websites to perform port scans on your behalf so as not to reveal your own IP.
  • tcpdump/libpcap – Common packet analyzer that runs under the command line.
  • Wireshark – Widely-used graphical, cross-platform network protocol analyzer.
  • Network-Tools.com – Website offering an interface to numerous basic network utilities like ping, traceroute, whois, and more.
  • netsniff-ng – Swiss army knife for for network sniffing.
  • Intercepter-NG – Multifunctional network toolkit.
  • SPARTA – Graphical interface offering scriptable, configurable access to existing network infrastructure scanning and enumeration tools.
  • dnschef – Highly configurable DNS proxy for pentesters.
  • DNSDumpster – Online DNS recon and search service.
  • CloudFail – Unmask server IP addresses hidden behind Cloudflare by searching old database records and detecting misconfigured DNS.
  • dnsenum – Perl script that enumerates DNS information from a domain, attempts zone transfers, performs a brute force dictionary style attack, and then performs reverse look-ups on the results.
  • dnsmap – Passive DNS network mapper.
  • dnsrecon – DNS enumeration script.
  • dnstracer – Determines where a given DNS server gets its information from, and follows the chain of DNS servers.
  • passivedns-client – Library and query tool for querying several passive DNS providers.
  • passivedns – Network sniffer that logs all DNS server replies for use in a passive DNS setup.
  • Mass Scan – TCP port scanner, spews SYN packets asynchronously, scanning entire Internet in under 5 minutes.
  • Zarp – Network attack tool centered around the exploitation of local networks.
  • mitmproxy – Interactive TLS-capable intercepting HTTP proxy for penetration testers and software developers.
  • Morpheus – Automated ettercap TCP/IP Hijacking tool.
  • mallory – HTTP/HTTPS proxy over SSH.
  • SSH MITM – Intercept SSH connections with a proxy; all plaintext passwords and sessions are logged to disk.
  • Netzob – Reverse engineering, traffic generation and fuzzing of communication protocols.
  • DET – Proof of concept to perform data exfiltration using either single or multiple channel(s) at the same time.
  • pwnat – Punches holes in firewalls and NATs.
  • dsniff – Collection of tools for network auditing and pentesting.
  • tgcd – Simple Unix network utility to extend the accessibility of TCP/IP based network services beyond firewalls.
  • smbmap – Handy SMB enumeration tool.
  • scapy – Python-based interactive packet manipulation program & library.
  • Dshell – Network forensic analysis framework.
  • Debookee – Simple and powerful network traffic analyzer for macOS.
  • Dripcap – Caffeinated packet analyzer.
  • Printer Exploitation Toolkit (PRET) – Tool for printer security testing capable of IP and USB connectivity, fuzzing, and exploitation of PostScript, PJL, and PCL printer language features.
  • Praeda – Automated multi-function printer data harvester for gathering usable data during security assessments.
  • routersploit – Open source exploitation framework similar to Metasploit but dedicated to embedded devices.
  • evilgrade – Modular framework to take advantage of poor upgrade implementations by injecting fake updates.
  • XRay – Network (sub)domain discovery and reconnaissance automation tool.
  • Ettercap – Comprehensive, mature suite for machine-in-the-middle attacks.
  • BetterCAP – Modular, portable and easily extensible MITM framework.

Wireless Network Tools

  • Aircrack-ng – Set of tools for auditing wireless networks.
  • Kismet – Wireless network detector, sniffer, and IDS.
  • Reaver – Brute force attack against WiFi Protected Setup.
  • Wifite – Automated wireless attack tool.
  • Fluxion – Suite of automated social engineering based WPA attacks.

Transport Layer Security Tools

  • SSLyze – Fast and comprehensive TLS/SSL configuration analyzer to help identify security mis-configurations.
  • tls_prober – Fingerprint a server’s SSL/TLS implementation.

Web Exploitation

  • OWASP Zed Attack Proxy (ZAP) – Feature-rich, scriptable HTTP intercepting proxy and fuzzer for penetration testing web applications.
  • Fiddler – Free cross-platform web debugging proxy with user-friendly companion tools.
  • Burp Suite – Integrated platform for performing security testing of web applications.
  • autochrome – Easy to install a test browser with all the appropriate setting needed for web application testing with native Burp support, from NCCGroup.
  • Browser Exploitation Framework (BeEF) – Command and control server for delivering exploits to commandeered Web browsers.
  • Offensive Web Testing Framework (OWTF) – Python-based framework for pentesting Web applications based on the OWASP Testing Guide.
  • WordPress Exploit Framework – Ruby framework for developing and using modules which aid in the penetration testing of WordPress powered websites and systems.
  • WPSploit – Exploit WordPress-powered websites with Metasploit.
  • SQLmap – Automatic SQL injection and database takeover tool.
  • tplmap – Automatic server-side template injection and Web server takeover tool.
  • weevely3 – Weaponized web shell.
  • Wappalyzer – Wappalyzer uncovers the technologies used on websites.
  • WhatWeb – Website fingerprinter.
  • BlindElephant – Web application fingerprinter.
  • wafw00f – Identifies and fingerprints Web Application Firewall (WAF) products.
  • fimap – Find, prepare, audit, exploit and even Google automatically for LFI/RFI bugs.
  • Kadabra – Automatic LFI exploiter and scanner.
  • Kadimus – LFI scan and exploit tool.
  • liffy – LFI exploitation tool.
  • Commix – Automated all-in-one operating system command injection and exploitation tool.
  • DVCS Ripper – Rip web accessible (distributed) version control systems: SVN/GIT/HG/BZR.
  • GitTools – Automatically find and download Web-accessible .git repositories.
  • sslstrip – Demonstration of the HTTPS stripping attacks.
  • sslstrip2 – SSLStrip version to defeat HSTS.

Hex Editors

  • HexEdit.js – Browser-based hex editing.
  • Hexinator – World’s finest (proprietary, commercial) Hex Editor.
  • Frhed – Binary file editor for Windows.
  • 0xED – Native macOS hex editor that supports plug-ins to display custom data types.

File Format Analysis Tools

  • Kaitai Struct – File formats and network protocols dissection language and web IDE, generating parsers in C++, C#, Java, JavaScript, Perl, PHP, Python, Ruby.
  • Veles – Binary data visualization and analysis tool.
  • Hachoir – Python library to view and edit a binary stream as tree of fields and tools for metadata extraction.

Defense Evasion Tools

  • Veil – Generate metasploit payloads that bypass common anti-virus solutions.
  • shellsploit – Generates custom shellcode, backdoors, injectors, optionally obfuscates every byte via encoders.
  • Hyperion – Runtime encryptor for 32-bit portable executables (“PE .exes”).
  • AntiVirus Evasion Tool (AVET) – Post-process exploits containing executable files targeted for Windows machines to avoid being recognized by antivirus software.
  • peCloak.py – Automates the process of hiding a malicious Windows executable from antivirus (AV) detection.
  • peCloakCapstone – Multi-platform fork of the peCloak.py automated malware antivirus evasion tool.
  • UniByAv – Simple obfuscator that takes raw shellcode and generates Anti-Virus friendly executables by using a brute-forcable, 32-bit XOR key.

Hash Cracking Tools

  • John the Ripper – Fast password cracker.
  • Hashcat – The more fast hash cracker.
  • CeWL – Generates custom wordlists by spidering a target’s website and collecting unique words.

Windows Utilities

  • Sysinternals Suite – The Sysinternals Troubleshooting Utilities.
  • Windows Credentials Editor – Inspect logon sessions and add, change, list, and delete associated credentials, including Kerberos tickets.
  • mimikatz – Credentials extraction tool for Windows operating system.
  • PowerSploit – PowerShell Post-Exploitation Framework.
  • Windows Exploit Suggester – Detects potential missing patches on the target.
  • Responder – LLMNR, NBT-NS and MDNS poisoner.
  • Bloodhound – Graphical Active Directory trust relationship explorer.
  • Empire – Pure PowerShell post-exploitation agent.
  • Fibratus – Tool for exploration and tracing of the Windows kernel.
  • wePWNise – Generates architecture independent VBA code to be used in Office documents or templates and automates bypassing application control and exploit mitigation software.
  • redsnarf – Post-exploitation tool for retrieving password hashes and credentials from Windows workstations, servers, and domain controllers.
  • Magic Unicorn – Shellcode generator for numerous attack vectors, including Microsoft Office macros, PowerShell, HTML applications (HTA), or certutil (using fake certificates).

GNU/Linux Utilities

macOS Utilities

  • Bella – Pure Python post-exploitation data mining and remote administration tool for macOS.

DDoS Tools

  • LOIC – Open source network stress tool for Windows.
  • JS LOIC – JavaScript in-browser version of LOIC.
  • SlowLoris – DoS tool that uses low bandwidth on the attacking side.
  • HOIC – Updated version of Low Orbit Ion Cannon, has ‘boosters’ to get around common counter measures.
  • T50 – Faster network stress tool.
  • UFONet – Abuses OSI layer 7 HTTP to create/manage ‘zombies’ and to conduct different attacks using; GET/POST, multithreading, proxies, origin spoofing methods, cache evasion techniques, etc.

Social Engineering Tools

  • Social Engineer Toolkit (SET) – Open source pentesting framework designed for social engineering featuring a number of custom attack vectors to make believable attacks quickly.
  • King Phisher – Phishing campaign toolkit used for creating and managing multiple simultaneous phishing attacks with custom email and server content.
  • Evilginx – MITM attack framework used for phishing credentials and session cookies from any Web service.
  • wifiphisher – Automated phishing attacks against WiFi networks.
  • Catphish – Tool for phishing and corporate espionage written in Ruby.

OSINT Tools

  • Maltego – Proprietary software for open source intelligence and forensics, from Paterva.
  • theHarvester – E-mail, subdomain and people names harvester.
  • creepy – Geolocation OSINT tool.
  • metagoofil – Metadata harvester.
  • Google Hacking Database – Database of Google dorks; can be used for recon.
  • Google-dorks – Common Google dorks and others you probably don’t know.
  • GooDork – Command line Google dorking tool.
  • dork-cli – Command line Google dork tool.
  • Censys – Collects data on hosts and websites through daily ZMap and ZGrab scans.
  • Shodan – World’s first search engine for Internet-connected devices.
  • recon-ng – Full-featured Web Reconnaissance framework written in Python.
  • github-dorks – CLI tool to scan github repos/organizations for potential sensitive information leak.
  • vcsmap – Plugin-based tool to scan public version control systems for sensitive information.
  • Spiderfoot – Multi-source OSINT automation tool with a Web UI and report visualizations
  • BinGoo – GNU/Linux bash based Bing and Google Dorking Tool.
  • fast-recon – Perform Google dorks against a domain.
  • snitch – Information gathering via dorks.
  • Sn1per – Automated Pentest Recon Scanner.
  • Threat Crowd – Search engine for threats.
  • Virus Total – VirusTotal is a free service that analyzes suspicious files and URLs and facilitates the quick detection of viruses, worms, trojans, and all kinds of malware.
  • DataSploit – OSINT visualizer utilizing Shodan, Censys, Clearbit, EmailHunter, FullContact, and Zoomeye behind the scenes.
  • AQUATONE – Subdomain discovery tool utilizing various open sources producing a report that can be used as input to other tools.

Anonymity Tools

  • Tor – Free software and onion routed overlay network that helps you defend against traffic analysis.
  • OnionScan – Tool for investigating the Dark Web by finding operational security issues introduced by Tor hidden service operators.
  • I2P – The Invisible Internet Project.
  • Nipe – Script to redirect all traffic from the machine to the Tor network.
  • What Every Browser Knows About You – Comprehensive detection page to test your own Web browser’s configuration for privacy and identity leaks.

Reverse Engineering Tools

  • Interactive Disassembler (IDA Pro) – Proprietary multi-processor disassembler and debugger for Windows, GNU/Linux, or macOS; also has a free version, IDA Free.
  • WDK/WinDbg – Windows Driver Kit and WinDbg.
  • OllyDbg – x86 debugger for Windows binaries that emphasizes binary code analysis.
  • Radare2 – Open source, crossplatform reverse engineering framework.
  • x64dbg – Open source x64/x32 debugger for windows.
  • Immunity Debugger – Powerful way to write exploits and analyze malware.
  • Evan’s Debugger – OllyDbg-like debugger for GNU/Linux.
  • Medusa – Open source, cross-platform interactive disassembler.
  • plasma – Interactive disassembler for x86/ARM/MIPS. Generates indented pseudo-code with colored syntax code.
  • peda – Python Exploit Development Assistance for GDB.
  • dnSpy – Tool to reverse engineer .NET assemblies.
  • binwalk – Fast, easy to use tool for analyzing, reverse engineering, and extracting firmware images.
  • PyREBox – Python scriptable Reverse Engineering sandbox by Cisco-Talos.
  • Voltron – Extensible debugger UI toolkit written in Python.
  • Capstone – Lightweight multi-platform, multi-architecture disassembly framework.

Physical Access Tools

  • LAN Turtle – Covert “USB Ethernet Adapter” that provides remote access, network intelligence gathering, and MITM capabilities when installed in a local network.
  • USB Rubber Ducky – Customizable keystroke injection attack platform masquerading as a USB thumbdrive.
  • Poisontap – Siphons cookies, exposes internal (LAN-side) router and installs web backdoor on locked computers.
  • WiFi Pineapple – Wireless auditing and penetration testing platform.
  • Proxmark3 – RFID/NFC cloning, replay, and spoofing toolkit often used for analyzing and attacking proximity cards/readers, wireless keys/keyfobs, and more.

Side-channel Tools

  • ChipWhisperer – Complete open-source toolchain for side-channel power analysis and glitching attacks.

CTF Tools

  • ctf-tools – Collection of setup scripts to install various security research tools easily and quickly deployable to new machines.
  • Pwntools – Rapid exploit development framework built for use in CTFs.
  • RsaCtfTool – Decrypt data enciphered using weak RSA keys, and recover private keys from public keys using a variety of automated attacks.

Penetration Testing Report Templates

Books

Penetration Testing Books

Hackers Handbook Series

Defensive Development

Network Analysis Books

Reverse Engineering Books

Malware Analysis Books

Windows Books

Social Engineering Books

Lock Picking Books

Defcon Suggested Reading

Vulnerability Databases

  • Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) – Dictionary of common names (i.e., CVE Identifiers) for publicly known security vulnerabilities.
  • National Vulnerability Database (NVD) – United States government’s National Vulnerability Database provides additional meta-data (CPE, CVSS scoring) of the standard CVE List along with a fine-grained search engine.
  • US-CERT Vulnerability Notes Database – Summaries, technical details, remediation information, and lists of vendors affected by software vulnerabilities, aggregated by the United States Computer Emergency Response Team (US-CERT).
  • Full-Disclosure – Public, vendor-neutral forum for detailed discussion of vulnerabilities, often publishes details before many other sources.
  • Bugtraq (BID) – Software security bug identification database compiled from submissions to the SecurityFocus mailing list and other sources, operated by Symantec, Inc.
  • Exploit-DB – Non-profit project hosting exploits for software vulnerabilities, provided as a public service by Offensive Security.
  • Microsoft Security Bulletins – Announcements of security issues discovered in Microsoft software, published by the Microsoft Security Response Center (MSRC).
  • Microsoft Security Advisories – Archive of security advisories impacting Microsoft software.
  • Mozilla Foundation Security Advisories – Archive of security advisories impacting Mozilla software, including the Firefox Web Browser.
  • Packet Storm – Compendium of exploits, advisories, tools, and other security-related resources aggregated from across the industry.
  • CXSecurity – Archive of published CVE and Bugtraq software vulnerabilities cross-referenced with a Google dork database for discovering the listed vulnerability.
  • SecuriTeam – Independent source of software vulnerability information.
  • Vulnerability Lab – Open forum for security advisories organized by category of exploit target.
  • Zero Day Initiative – Bug bounty program with publicly accessible archive of published security advisories, operated by TippingPoint.
  • Vulners – Security database of software vulnerabilities.
  • Inj3ct0r (Onion service) – Exploit marketplace and vulnerability information aggregator.
  • Open Source Vulnerability Database (OSVDB) – Historical archive of security vulnerabilities in computerized equipment, no longer adding to its vulnerability database as of April, 2016.
  • HPI-VDB – Aggregator of cross-referenced software vulnerabilities offering free-of-charge API access, provided by the Hasso-Plattner Institute, Potsdam.

Security Courses

Information Security Conferences

  • DEF CON – Annual hacker convention in Las Vegas.
  • Black Hat – Annual security conference in Las Vegas.
  • BSides – Framework for organising and holding security conferences.
  • CCC – Annual meeting of the international hacker scene in Germany.
  • DerbyCon – Annual hacker conference based in Louisville.
  • PhreakNIC – Technology conference held annually in middle Tennessee.
  • ShmooCon – Annual US East coast hacker convention.
  • CarolinaCon – Infosec conference, held annually in North Carolina.
  • CHCon – Christchurch Hacker Con, Only South Island of New Zealand hacker con.
  • SummerCon – One of the oldest hacker conventions, held during Summer.
  • Hack.lu – Annual conference held in Luxembourg.
  • Hackfest – Largest hacking conference in Canada.
  • HITB – Deep-knowledge security conference held in Malaysia and The Netherlands.
  • Troopers – Annual international IT Security event with workshops held in Heidelberg, Germany.
  • Hack3rCon – Annual US hacker conference.
  • ThotCon – Annual US hacker conference held in Chicago.
  • LayerOne – Annual US security conference held every spring in Los Angeles.
  • DeepSec – Security Conference in Vienna, Austria.
  • SkyDogCon – Technology conference in Nashville.
  • SECUINSIDE – Security Conference in Seoul.
  • DefCamp – Largest Security Conference in Eastern Europe, held annually in Bucharest, Romania.
  • AppSecUSA – Annual conference organized by OWASP.
  • BruCON – Annual security conference in Belgium.
  • Infosecurity Europe – Europe’s number one information security event, held in London, UK.
  • Nullcon – Annual conference in Delhi and Goa, India.
  • RSA Conference USA – Annual security conference in San Francisco, California, USA.
  • Swiss Cyber Storm – Annual security conference in Lucerne, Switzerland.
  • Virus Bulletin Conference – Annual conference going to be held in Denver, USA for 2016.
  • Ekoparty – Largest Security Conference in Latin America, held annually in Buenos Aires, Argentina.
  • 44Con – Annual Security Conference held in London.
  • BalCCon – Balkan Computer Congress, annually held in Novi Sad, Serbia.
  • FSec – FSec – Croatian Information Security Gathering in Varaždin, Croatia.

Information Security Magazines

Awesome Lists

Credit and Original Location: https://github.com/enaqx/awesome-pentest

This article has been provided for educational purpose only.

Cloud Adaptation and SharePoint Server Test Lab Guide for IT Professionals

Use these cloud adoption Test Lab Guides (TLGs) to set up demonstration or dev/test environments for Office 365, Enterprise Mobility + Security (EMS), Dynamics 365, and Office Server products.

TLGs help you quickly learn about Microsoft products. They’re great for situations where you need to evaluate a technology or configuration before you decide whether it’s right for you or before you roll it out to users. The “I built it out myself and it works” hands-on experience helps you understand the deployment requirements of a new product or solution so you can better plan for hosting it in production.

TLGs also create representative environments for development and testing of applications, also known as dev/test environments.

Test Lab Guides in the Microsoft Cloud

See these additional resources before diving in:

Use these articles to build your Office 365 dev/test environment:

  • Base Configuration dev/test environment

    Create a simplified intranet running in Microsoft Azure infrastructure services. This is an optional step if you want to build a simulated enterprise configuration.

  • Office 365 dev/test environment

    Create an Office 365 Enterprise E5 trial subscription, which you can do from your computer or from a simplified intranet running in Azure infrastructure services.

  • DirSync for your Office 365 dev/test environment

    Install and configure Azure AD Connect for directory synchronization with password synchronization. This is an optional step if you want to build a simulated enterprise configuration.

For your Office 365 dev/test environment, use these articles to demonstrate enterprise features of Office 365:

Create a dev/test environment for Microsoft 365 Enterprise scenarios with these articles:

Add a Dynamics 365 trial subscription and test Office 365 and Dynamics 365 integrated features and scenarios with these articles:

Create a dev/test environment that includes all of Microsoft’s cloud offerings: Office 365, Azure, EMS, and Dynamics 365. See The One Microsoft Cloud dev/test environment for the step-by-step instructions.

You can create a cross-premises dev/test environment, which includes an Azure virtual network and a simulated on-premises network, with these articles:

Here are additional cloud-based dev/test environments that you can create in Azure infrastructure services:

Join the discussion

Contact us Description
What cloud adoption content do you need? We are creating content for cloud adoption that spans multiple Microsoft cloud platforms and services. Let us know what you think about our cloud adoption content, or ask for specific content by sending email to cloudadopt@microsoft.com.
Join the cloud adoption discussion If you are passionate about cloud-based solutions, consider joining the Cloud Adoption Advisory Board (CAAB) to connect with a larger, vibrant community of Microsoft content developers, industry professionals, and customers from around the globe. To join, add yourself as a member of the CAAB (Cloud Adoption Advisory Board) space of the Microsoft Tech Community and send us a quick email at CAAB@microsoft.com. Anyone can read community-related content on the CAAB blog. However, CAAB members get invitations to private webinars that describe new cloud adoption resources and solutions.
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Free Step by Step SharePoint Server 2013 Lab Guides by Microsoft

This Post contains a bunch of Free Step by Step SharePoint Server 2013 Lab Guides that Microsoft gives for free on its Download Center. Usually I post them together with the other free resources that Microsoft offers, however this is a Test Lab Guide (TLG) only post, and the rest of the resources will come later in the month.

Free Step by Step SharePoint Server 2013 Lab Guides by Microsoft

Microsoft Download Center

  1. Test Lab Guide: Configure SharePoint Server 2013 in a three-tier farm
  2. Test Lab Guide: Configure intranet and team sites for SharePoint Server 2013
  3. Test Lab Guide: Demonstrate permissions with SharePoint Server 2013
  4. Test Lab Guide: Demonstrate profile synchronization for SharePoint Server 2013
  5. Test Lab Guide: Demonstrate Social Features for SharePoint Server 2013
  6. Test Lab Guide: Demonstrate SAML-based Claims Authentication with SharePoint Server 2013
  7. Test Lab Guide: Demonstrate forms-based claims authentication for SharePoint Server 2013
  8. Test Lab Guide: Configure eDiscovery for SharePoint Server 2013
  9. Test Lab Guide: Create a Business Intelligence Baseline Environment
  10. Test Lab Guide: Configure Secure Store
  11. Test Lab Guide: Configure Excel Services
  12. Test Lab Guide: Configure the Excel Services unattended service account
  13. Test Lab Guide: Configure Excel Services data refresh by using an embedded connection
  14. Test Lab Guide: Configure Excel Services data refresh by using an external connection
  15. Test Lab Guide: Configure Visio Services
  16. Test Lab Guide: Configure the Visio Services unattended service account
  17. Test Lab Guide: Configure Visio Services data refresh using an external connection
  18. Test Lab Guide: Configure PerformancePoint Services
  19. Test Lab Guide: Configure data access for PerformancePoint Services
  20. Test Lab Guide Mini-Module: Configuring a Second SharePoint Server 2013 Farm 
  21. Test Lab Guide: Configure a Highly Available SharePoint Server 2013 Search Topology
  22. Test Lab Guide: Configure an Integrated Exchange, Lync, and SharePoint Test Lab

A very nice Poster from Microsoft that resumes the above http://www.microsoft.com/en-ca/download/details.aspx?id=39298
Teched North America

  1. Configuring Office Web Applications for Microsoft SharePoint 2013 
  2. Configuring Social Features in Microsoft SharePoint 2013 
  3. Extending the Search Experience in Microsoft SharePoint 2013 
  4. Introduction to Web Content Management in Microsoft SharePoint 2013 
  5. Designing a Microsoft SharePoint 2013 Site 

Migrate Google G-Suite mailboxes to Office 365

Migrate your IMAP mailboxes to Office 365 gives you an overview of the migration process. Read it first and when you’re familiar with the contents of that article, return to this topic to learn how to migrate mailboxes from G Suite (formerly known as Google Apps) Gmail to Office 365. You must be a global admin in Office 365 to complete IMAP migration steps.

Looking for Windows PowerShell commands? See User PowerShell to perform an IMAP migration to Office 365.

Want to migrate other types of IMAP mailboxes? See Migrate other types of IMAP mailboxes to Office 365 .

Migration from G Suite mailboxes using the Office 365 admin center

You can use the setup wizard in the Office 365 admin center for an IMAP migration. See IMAP migration in the Office 365 admin center for instructions.

IMPORTANT: IMAP migration will only migrate emails, not calendar and contact information. Users can import their own email, contacts, and other mailbox information to Office 365. See Migrate email and contacts to Office 365 for Business to learn how.

Before Office 365 can connect to Gmail or G Suites, all the account owners need to create an app password to access their account. This is because Google considers Outlook to be a less secure app and will not allow a connection to it with a password alone. For instructions, see Prepare your G Suite account for connecting to Outlook and Office 365. You’ll also need to make sure your G Suite users can turn on 2-step verification.

Gmail Migration tasks

The following list contains the migration tasks given in the order in which you should complete them.

Step 1: Verify you own your domain

In this task, you’ll first verify to Office 365 that you own the domain you used for your G Suite accounts.

Notes:

  • Another option is to use the your company name.onmicrosoft.com domain that is included with your Office 365 subscription instead of using your own custom domain. In that case, you can just add users as described in Create users in Office 365 and omit this task.
  • Most people, however, prefer to use their own domain.

Domain verification is a task you will go through as you setup Office 365. During the setup Office 365 setup wizard provides you with a TXT record you will add at your domain host provider. See Verify your domain in Office 365 for the steps to complete in Office 365 admin center, and choose a domain registrar from the two following options to see how to complete add the TXT record that your DNS host provider.

  • Your current DNS host provider is Google.    If you purchased your domain from Google and they are the DNS hosting provider, follow these instructions: Create DNS records when your domain is managed by Google.
  • You purchased your domain from another domain registrar.    If you purchased your domain from a different company, we provide instructions for many popular domain hosting providers.

Step 2: Add users to Office 365

You can add your users either one at a time, or several users at a time. When you add users you also add licenses to them. Each user has to have a mailbox on Office 365 before you can migrate email to it. Each user also needs a license that includes an Exchange Online plan to use his or her mailbox.

Important: At this point you have verified that you own the domain and created your G Suite users and mailboxes in Office 365 with your custom domain. Close the wizard at this step. Do not proceed to Set up domain, until your Gmail mailboxes are migrated to Office 365. You’ll finish the setup steps in task 7, Route Gmail directly to Office 365.

Step 3: Create a list of Gmail mailboxes to migrate

For this task, you create a migration file that contains a list of Gmail mailboxes to migrate to Office 365. The easiest way to create the migration file is by using Excel, so we use Excel in these instructions. You can use Excel 2013, Excel 2010, or Excel 2007.

When you create the migration file, you need to know the password of each Gmail mailbox that you want to migrate. We’re assuming you don’t know the user passwords, so you’ll probably need to assign temporary passwords (by resetting the passwords) to all mailboxes during the migration. You must be an administrator in G Suite to reset passwords.

You don’t have to migrate all Gmail mailboxes at once. You can do them in batches at your convenience. You can include up to 50,000 mailboxes (one row for each user) in your migration file. The file can be as large as 10 MB.

  1. Sign in to G Suite admin console using your administrator username and password.
  2. After you’re signed in, choose Users.

    List of users in the Google admin center.

  3. Select each user to identify each user’s email address. Write down the address.

    User details in the Google apps admin center

  4. Sign in to the Office 365 admin center, and go to Users > Active users. Keep an eye on the User name column. You’ll use this information in a minute. Keep the Office 365 admin center window open, too.

    User Name column in the Office 365 admin center.

  5. Start Excel.
  6. Use the following screenshot as a template to create the migration file in Excel. Start with the headings in row 1. Make sure they match the picture exactly and don’t contain spaces. The exact heading names are:
    • EmailAddress in cell A1.
    • UserName in cell B1.
    • Password in cell C1.

      Cell headings in the Excel migration file.

  7. Next enter the email address, user name, and password for each mailbox you want to migrate. Enter one mailbox per row.
    • Column A is the email address of the Office 365 mailbox. This is what’s shown in the User name column in Users > Active users in the Office 365 admin center.
    • Column B is the sign-in name for the user’s Gmail mailbox—for example, alberta@contoso.com.
    • Column C is the app password for the user’s Gmail mailbox. Creating the app password is described in Migration from G Suite mailboxes using the Office 365 admin center.

      A completed sample migration file.

  8. Save the file as a CSV file type, and then close Excel.

    Shows the Save As CSV option in Excel.

Step 4: Connect Office 365 to Gmail

To migrate Gmail mailboxes successfully, Office 365 needs to connect and communicate with Gmail. To do this, Office 365 uses a migration endpoint. Migration endpoint is a technical term that describes the settings that are used to create the connection so you can migrate the mailboxes. You create the migration endpoint in this task.

  1. Go to the Exchange admin center.
  2. In the EAC, go to Recipients > Migration > More More icon > Migration endpoints.

    Select Migration endpoint.

  3. Click New New icon to create a new migration endpoint.
  4. On the Select the migration endpoint type page, choose IMAP.
  5. On the IMAP migration configuration page, set IMAP server to imap.gmail.com and keep the default settings the same.
  6. Click Next. The migration service uses the settings to test the connection to Gmail system. If the connection works, the Enter general information page opens.
  7. On the Enter general information page, type a Migration endpoint name, for example, Test5-endpoint. Leave the other two boxes blank to use the default values.

    Migration endpoint name.

  8. Click New to create the migration endpoint.

Step 5: Create a migration batch and start migrating Gmail mailboxes

You use a migration batch to migrate groups of Gmail mailboxes to Office 365 at the same time. The batch consists of the Gmail mailboxes that you listed in the migration file in the previous task.

Tips:

  • It’s a good idea to create a test migration batch with a small number of mailboxes to first test the process.
  • Use migration files with the same number of rows, and run the batches at similar times during the day. Then compare the total running time for each test batch. This helps you estimate how long it could take to migrate all your mailboxes, how large each migration batch should be, and how many simultaneous connections to the source email system you should use to balance migration speed and Internet bandwidth.
  1. In the Office 365 admin center, navigate to Admin centers > Exchange.

    Go to Exchange admin center.

  2. In the Exchange admin center, go to Recipients > Migration.
  3. Click New New icon > Migrate to Exchange Online.

    Select Migrate to Exchange Online

  4. Choose IMAP migration > Next.
  5. On the Select the users page, click Browse to specify the migration file you created. After you select your migration file, Office 365 checks it to make sure:
    • It isn’t empty.
    • It uses comma-separated formatting.
    • It doesn’t contain more than 50,000 rows.
    • It includes the required attributes in the header row.
    • It contains rows with the same number of columns as the header row.

    If any one of these checks fails, you’ll get an error that describes the reason for the failure. If you get an error, you must fix the migration file and resubmit it to create a migration batch.

  6. After Office 365 validates the migration file, it displays the number of users listed in the file as the number of Gmail mailboxes to migrate.

    New migration batch with CSV file

  7. Click Next.
  8. On the Set the migration endpoint page, select the migration endpoint that you created in the previous step, and click Next.
  9. On the IMAP migration configuration page, accept the default values, and click Next.
  10. On the Move configuration page, type the name (no spaces or special characters) of the migration batch in the box—for example, Test5-migration. The default migration batch name that’s displayed is the name of the migration file that you specified. The migration batch name is displayed in the list on the migration dashboard after you create the migration batch.

    You can also enter the names of the folders you want to exclude from migration. For example, Shared, Junk Email, and Deleted. Click Add Add icon to add them to the excluded list. You can also use the edit icon Add icon to change a folder name and the remove icon Remove icon to delete the folder name.

    Move configuration dialog

  11. Click Next
  12. On the Start the batch page, do the following:
    • Choose Browse to send a copy of the migration reports to other users. By default, migration reports are emailed to you. You can also access the migration reports from the properties page of the migration batch.
    • Choose Automatically start the batch > new. The migration starts immediately with the status Syncing.

      Micgration batch is syncing

Note: If the status shows Syncing for a long time, you may be experiencing bandwidth limits set by Google. For more information, see Bandwidth limits.

Verify that the migration worked

  • In the Exchange admin center, go to Recipients > Migration. Verify that the batch is displayed in the migration dashboard. If the migration completed successfully, the status is Synced.
  • If this task fails, check the associated Mailbox status reports for specific errors, and double-check that your migration file has the correct Office 365 email address in the EmailAddress column.

Verify a successful mailbox migration to Office 365

  • Ask your migrated users to complete the following tasks:
    • Go to the Office 365 sign-in page, and sign in with your user name and temporary password.
    • Update your password, and set your time zone. It’s important that you select the correct time zone to make sure your calendar and email settings are correct.
    • When Outlook Web App opens, send an email message to another Office 365 user to verify that you can send email.
    • Choose Outlook, and check that your email messages and folders are all there.

Optional: Reduce email delays

Although this task is optional, doing it can help avoid delays in the receiving email in the new Office 365 mailboxes.

When people outside of your organization send you email, their email systems don’t double-check where to send that email every time. Instead, their systems save the location of your email system based on a setting in your DNS server known as a time-to-live (TTL). If you change the location of your email system before the TTL expires, the sender’s email system tries to send email to the old location before figuring out that the location changed. This can result in a mail delivery delay. One way to avoid this is to lower the TTL that your DNS server gives to servers outside of your organization. This will make the other organizations refresh the location of your email system more often.

Most email systems ask for an update each hour if a short interval such as 3,600 seconds (one hour) is set. We recommend that you set the interval at least this low before you start the email migration. This setting allows all the systems that send you email enough time to process the change. Then, when you make the final switch over to Office 365, you can change the TTL back to a longer interval.

The place to change the TTL setting is on your email system’s mail exchanger record, also called an MX record. This lives in your public facing DNS. If you have more than one MX record, you need to change the value on each record to 3,600 seconds or less.

Don’t worry if you skip this task. It might take longer for email to start showing up in your new Office 365 mailboxes, but it will get there.

If you need some help configuring your DNS settings, see Create DNS records for Office 365 when you manage your DNS records.

Step 6: Update your DNS records to route Gmail directly to Office 365

Email systems use a DNS record called an MX record to figure out where to deliver email. During the email migration process, your MX record was pointing to your Gmail system. Now that you’ve completed your email migration to Office 365, it’s time to point your MX record to Office 365. After you change your MX record following these steps, email sent to users at your custom domain is delivered to Office 365 mailboxes

For many DNS providers, there are specific instructions to change your MX record, see Create DNS records for Office 365 when you manage your DNS records for instructions. If your DNS provider isn’t included, or if you want to get a sense of the general directions, general MX record instructions are provided as well. See Create DNS records at any DNS hosting provider for Office 365 for instructions.

  1. Sign in to Office 365 with your work or school account.
  2. Go to the Domains page.
  3. Select your domain and then choose Fix issues.

    The status shows Fix issues because you stopped the wizard partway through so you could migrate your Gmail email to Office 365 before switching your MX record.

    Domain that needs to be fixed.

  4. For each DNS record type that you need to add, choose What do I fix?, and follow the instructions to add the records for Office 365 services.
  5. After you’ve added all the records, you’ll see a message that your domain is set up correctly: Contoso.com is set up correctly. No action is required.

It can take up to 72 hours for the email systems of your customers and partners to recognize the changed MX record. Wait at least 72 hours before you proceed to stopping synchronization with Gmail.

Step 7: Stop synchronization with Gmail

During the last task, you updated the MX record for your domain. Now it’s time to verify that all email is being routed to Office 365. After verification, you can delete the migration batch and stop the synchronization between Gmail and Office 365. Before you take this step:

  • Make sure that your users are using Office 365 exclusively for email. After you delete the migration batch, email that is sent to Gmail mailboxes isn’t copied to Office 365 This means your users can’t get that email, so make sure that all users are on the new system.
  • Let the migration batch run for at least 72 hours before you delete it. This makes the following two things more likely:
    • Your Gmail mailboxes and Office 365 mailboxes have synchronized at least once (they synchronize once a day).
    • The email systems of your customers and partners have recognized the changes to your MX records and are now properly sending email to your Office 365 mailboxes.

When you delete the migration batch, the migration service cleans up any records related to the migration batch and removes it from the migration dashboard.

Delete a migration batch

  1. In the Exchange admin center, go to Recipients > Migration.
  2. On the migration dashboard, select the batch, and then click Delete.

How do you know this worked?

  • In the Exchange admin center, navigate to Recipients > Migration. Verify that the migration batch no longer is listed on the migration dashboard.
Step 8: Users migrate their calendar and contacts

After your migrate their email, users can import their Gmail calendar and contacts to Outlook: